Academies of Nashville Blog

The Academies enable students to learn through the lens of a career or academic theme in a personalized learning community. Through their academy, students are exposed to a multitude of career and college opportunities, industry skills, and potential employers by way of classroom speakers, site visits, job shadowing and internships.

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  • Cane Ridge, Overton, and McGavock High School's recognized for having 'Model Academies' through the National Career Academy Coalition.

    Cane Ridge, Overton, and McGavock High School's recognized for having 'Model Academies' through the National Career Academy Coalition.

  • 2013 My Future. My Way. Career Exploration Fair allows 6,000 freshman to experience nearly 400 jobs.

    2013 My Future. My Way. Career Exploration Fair allows 6,000 freshman to experience nearly 400 jobs.

Internships

Internships

Internships allow student to see the realities of a profession or industry and the connections between learning and the real world.
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Job Shadowing

Job Shadowing

Job shadowing connects students with the real working world and gives them an insider's view of a profession and the everyday duties and responsibilities.
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Externships

Externships

Externships give teachers an opportunity to have a real world professional experience at a host organization to develop a project-based curriculum.
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Partnerships

Partnerships

Business and community partners are essential factors in preparing students for life after high school and are integral to the educational experiences students receive.
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Hillsboro Establishes the Red Cross Club

Hillsboro High School’s Academy of Global Health and Science has become the first high school  to establish a Red Cross Club chapter in partnership with the American Red Cross. Janel, P. a senior at Hillsboro High School explains what this means and the purpose of the club.

redcross-logo As part of the largest humanitarian network in the world, the Red Cross Club gives students a way to put their talent, skills and passion to work for a greater purpose.

In a Red Cross Club, we will work closely with the local Red Cross chapter, engaging in projects that address some of our country’s and world’s greatest needs including preparing our community for disasters and hosting life saving blood drives. We will create, plan and participate in service projects that will help our school, our community and make an impact around the globe.

Red Cross Clubs also offer many opportunities for self-development, and empower us to build critical leadership skills. And of course, Red Cross Clubs can be a fun, energetic experience that expand our social network. We may find ourselves building life-long friendships as we connect with other young volunteers who have the same passion for helping people as we do!

Hillsboro High School has nothing but leaders that will work to ensure the best for American Red Cross. We plan to be the first Davidson County club to spread the word and inform our community that this is a great purpose to support. There’s nothing wrong with starting early as a leader in the community for such a widely known organization. What better place than Hillsboro to start off?  Hillsboro has a supportive community that will work for the success of this program. We reach all the criteria of being a leader and having the skills and talents in order to function for our local Red Cross.  Hillsboro can benefit from the partnership with the Red Cross, just as the Red Cross can benefit from all of the opportunities provided by administrators, teachers, and students. We know the Red Cross is known globally, which makes them a perfect partner for Hillsboro’s Academy of Global Health and Science.

Personally, I am planning to leave a legacy at Hillsboro with the Red Cross Club.  I also plan to use this network and experience for my senior capstone project.  I think starting this program will be that legacy and I’m honored to be a part of it before I go to college. The recognition and volunteer work to save three people by one person donating blood is so impactful to me and will change our community.

 

Maplewood High School Virtual Tour

Take a tour of Maplewood High School. Learn more about the Academies at Maplewood and what learning looks like in Metro Nashville Public Schools.

Glencliff High School Virtual Tour

Take a tour of Glencliff High School.  Learn more about the Academies at Glencliff and what learning looks like in Metro Nashville Public Schools.

 

Pearl-Cohn Students Respond to Escalating Situation in Ferguson

Queen. M. and Destinee A. are both students in the Academy of Entertainment Management at Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School. As the news reports and social media conversations fill our media channels with information regarding Michael Brown and the situation in Ferguson, Mo. these two young ladies decided to respond. 

I [Queen] was up at 2:30 in the morning on a Friday watching CNN and seeing the conversations that people were having about the situation in Ferguson. I was really upset about what was happening and I felt that their community was going about their protests the wrong way. I felt like writing a song was the perfect message to get these feelings out to multiple generations.

I wrote the song that night. I finished close to 4 o’clock in the morning and I couldn’t sleep because I knew it was something that would make an impact. I worked on it all weekend and presented it to my teacher, Mr. Caldwell, on Monday.

From there, it spiraled into the song production and music video. We [Queen and Destinee] hope that this message will show that teens can positively contribute to a volatile situation. We just wanted to recognize what was going on; somewhere in this world there is a community that is hurting and if we work together, we can help heal this situation.

 

The MNPS Virtual School Virtual Tour

Take a tour of the MNPS Virtual School. Learn more about the Academies at the Virtual School and what learning looks like in Metro Nashville Public Schools.

Stratford STEM Magnet High Virtual Tour

Take a tour of Stratford STEM Magnet High School. Learn more about the Academies at Stratford and what learning looks like in Metro Nashville Public Schools.

Overton High School Virtual Tour

Take a tour of Overton High School. Learn more about the Academies at Overton and what learning looks like in Metro Nashville Public Schools.

Hunter Lane High School Virtual Tour

Take a tour of Hunters Lane High School. Learn more about the Academies at Hunters Lane and what learning looks like in Metro Nashville Public Schools.

 

Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School Virtual Tour

Take a tour of Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School. Learn more about the Academies at Pearl-Cohn and what learning looks like in Metro Nashville Public Schools.

Hillwood High School Virtual Tour

Take a Virtual Tour of Hillwood High School. See what learning looks like in Metro Nashville Public Schools and learn more about the Academies at Hillwood.

Hillsboro High School Virtual Tour

Take a Virtual Tour of Hillsboro High School. See what learning looks like in Metro Nashville Public Schools and learn more about the Academies at Hillsboro.

Cane Ridge High School Virtual Tour

Take a Virtual Tour of Cane Ridge High School. Learn more about the Academies at Cane Ridge and what learning looks like in the Academies of Nashville and Metro Nashville Public Schools.

Glencliff High School Student Qualifies for the National Agriscience Fair

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Glencliff Sophomore, Brett Hatch, with Glencliff FFA advisor, Lucy Prestwood

Brett Hatch, of the Glencliff FFA Chapter, has been named a finalist for the National Agriscience Fair through the National FFA Organization. Hatch will compete against 15 other finalists from across the country in the category of Food Product and Processing Systems Division I at the National FFA Convention in October in Louisville, Kentucky.

The National Agriscience Fair is a competition for FFA members who are interested in the science and technology of agriculture. Students are required to conduct a scientific research project and present their findings to a panel of judges with a display and report.

On top of the prestige of being a national finalist, the qualification is even more impressive in the fact that Hatch is only in the 10th grade. Hatch developed his concept, conducted his project, and won the State FFA Agriscience Fair as a freshman this past April. One national winner will be announced in each category at the National FFA Convention in October.

Whites Creek FFA Chapter a Finalist for Top National Honor

During the 2013-2014 school year, the Whites Creek FFA Chapter traveled across the state educating the public about alternative energy and the impact it has on the agricultural industry. Today, the chapter has once again been recognized for this inventive advocacy parade.

Today, the National FFA Organization named the Whites Creek FFA Chapter a national finalist in the Model of Innovation Award for chapter development. This award is only presented to 30 chapters in the United States and only ten chapters in three different categories: student, chapter, or community development.

A chapter must be a three-star chapter to be considered for the Model of Innovation award, in addition to doing something unique to influence the community. This award is sponsored nationally by John Deere and showcases innovative ideas and activities that a chapter participated in throughout the year. As a national finalist, the Whites Creek FFA Chapter members and their Program of Activities will be featured in a National FFA publication highlighting the top FFA chapters and what they provide to their members.

At the National FFA convention in October, the nation’s top chapter will be chosen after two students from each chapter present their chapter’s activities in front of a board of five judges.

Students Work to Improve Bike Safety over Summer Break

Internships give students the opportunity to see the realities of a profession or industry and the connections between learning and the real world. Delaine Wendling, a lead teachers from Stratford STEM Magnet High School‘s Academy of Science and Engineering,  had students who participated in an internship this summer though the Institute for Software Integrated Systems at Vanderbilt University.  In this post, Delaine write about her perceptions of the internship and the impact it had on her students.

The new school year looms just around the corner promising new interactions, knowledge, and growth. Oh yes, and impressive moments. My students never fail to impress me, whether it’s through their ability to talk their way out of a consequence or their innovative solutions to different problems. Today, my students delivered; and they delivered at a whole new level. The halls have yet to be roamed and the dust has just been wiped off of my desk yet my students have already blown my socks off. Students from Hume-Fogg, MLK, and, our very own, Stratford STEM High School participated in an internship at ISIS (Institute for Software Integrated Systems), a research organization of the school of engineering at Vanderbilt, this summer.

The students were challenged to improve a bike’s safety in a user friendly way. The students launched head first into the task and came out the other side with an informational and entertaining presentation to the public of their inventive new products. These included wheel lights that have the potential to be customizable, a brake light and turn signals, and a Graphical User Interface (GUI) that can track and display various metrics- i.e. speed, distance, calories burned, etc. All of these features are controlled by a computer attached to the bike. Developed safety features can all be sold separately, allowing a potential customer to pick and choose what s/he feels is important to her/him. Furthermore, their software is open source, allowing the program-savvy consumers to expand upon the existing framework and add their own features.

During the presentation, the students were transparent about their struggles and how they overcame them while creating their bike products. Students came into the internship with a multitude of experiences and skills amongst them. Specifically and thanks to our engineering program, Stratford STEM students brought the ability to work with CAD software (Computer-Aided Design) and 3-D printing. Throughout the internship, the students sought the expertise and advice of professors, graduate students, undergraduates, and each other to develop bike safety tools.  In addition, students self-taught, using the vast resources of the internet, the majority of the material needed to progress. They learned new, and improved familiar, skills including: collaboration, communication/presentation, problem solving, programming, etc. through the summer internship. Their intense motivation to learn came from the ownership they felt, their interest, and the relevance of the project, to name a few. This is the heart of Project Based Learning (PBL). The presentation I saw today further confirmed the importance of PBL to a students’ love for learning and the development of 21st century citizens. Stratford is no stranger to PBL and is actually becoming a MNPS PBL demonstration school this upcoming school year. So, stay tuned for the amazing projects our students will be engaged in throughout the year as well as the new bike safety products that will be hitting the market soon??!!

See more information here.