Archives for May 2012

Freshman Academy of the Year award goes to Stratford High School

Stratford STEM Magnet High School‘s Freshman Academy was named Freshman Academy of the Year at the 2012 Academies of Nashville Awards. The Freshman Academies are part of a larger effort to create a high school structure that supports learning and college preparation by grouping students into smaller learning communities. Stratford’s Freshman Academy encourages students to invest in their education as a means by which they can achieve their personal and professional goals in the future.

Academies of Nashville Stratford STEM High School

Teachers in the Stratford Freshman Academy look for creative methods to motivate students. The teachers offer extracurricular incentives such as making breakfast together or enjoying an impromptu “slip-n-slide” to reward students. The Freshman Academy teacher team believes that these rewards and incentives teach students the intrinsic value of achievement. This dedicated team of teachers can be found tutoring students for hours after the end of school to give extra support to ninth graders’ efforts.

The teachers in the Freshman Academy employ modern instructional design principals to create student-centered instruction. Students learn core STEM subjects through inquiry-based teaching and experiential learning. As a result, Stratford has posted remarkable gains in math and reading in only one year.

The Nashville Chamber of Commerce presented the 2012 Academies of Nashville Awards with the support of sponsors Deloitte and Altria. The awards were determined through a vote of MNPS administrators and executive staff, school board members, teachers, and community partners. These nominations were based on the National Career Academy Coalition‘s National Standards of Practice.

Nashville Arts Magazine shines spotlight on Hillwood

The May 2012 issue of Nashville Arts Magazine profiled the exciting activity that is going on at Hillwood High School‘s Academy of Art, Design, and Communications. Coby Ginsburg, a team leader in the Academy, writes about how students are pursuing their interests in the arts in a collaborative environment while also supporting the extracurricular events at the school. Whether designing the tickets for the school prom, creating the student-produced weekly newscast Topper News, or managing the student-run art gallery, Hillwood students are becoming part of the Nashville art community.Nashville Arts Magazine May 2012 Hillwood high school

The story on Hillwood’s Academy of Art, Design, and Communications is part of Nashville Arts Magazine’s new section on art education, ArtSmart. Supported by the Ayers Foundation and FirstBank, ArtSmart aims to promote news about art education in Nashville and put parents, teachers, and students in touch with opportunities for art education and enrichment in the Middle Tennessee community. To introduce the new feature of the print magazine and Web site, Deborah Walden writes:

Inspiring teachers, revolutionary new programs, and passionate community members make Nashville the perfect place for art and education to come together. Our hope is that this section creates a dialogue about the role of art in our culture and that it shines a light on programs in Music City that might influence cities around the world.

The Academies of Nashville depend on the tremendous talent and creativity of the Nashville art community to enrich the programs in our schools and connect our students with the artistic work happening here in Middle Tennessee. Students at Hillwood’s Academy of Art, Design, and Communications are gaining real-world experience by working with dedicated community partners such as Nashville Education and Community Art Television and the Parthenon.

Teacher Team Externship with The Hermitage

The Academies of Nashville provide students with meaningful, hands-on learning in context. Inquiry-based teaching and project-based learning are important for the Academies’ goal of teaching students how to think critically and creatively to solve problems in the classroom and real world. To bring these ideas to MNPS classrooms, academy partners in Nashville have joined forces with the Academies of Nashville to educate teachers about the realities of working life in different careers. The result of this collaboration is the Teacher Team Externship Program. The program is an opportunity for teachers to have a real-world professional experience at a host organization to develop a project-based curriculum that gives students industry exposure and applied learning. A teacher team works together to create interdisciplinary projects that reinforce the theme of their academy across subject areas.

The Hermitage historic home andrew jacksonTeachers from Antioch High School’s Academy of Teaching and Service participated in a teacher team externship in 2011 with The Hermitage, the historical home of President Andrew Jackson. After visiting The Hermitage and working with the curators and staff at the historic mansion and grounds, the teacher team implemented a curriculum that prepared students to teach history and social studies using real-world examples. Students in the Teaching as a Profession I class developed lesson plans and activities structured around Jacksonian American history, reviewed past and present agricultural methods used on The Hermitage’s grounds, reviewed teaching strategies and integration of technology, and reviewed presentation techniques.

Academies of Nashville Antioch High School

In order to make this teaching exercise into a real-world learning opportunity, the Academy of Teaching and Service partnered with Lakeview Elementary Design Center in conjunction with The Hermitage’s Junior Docent Program. Antioch students worked with a fourth-grade class from Lakeview to assess their knowledge of the Jacksonian era. Next, the high school students travelled to Lakeview to teach lessons and create bulletins boards for the class. In the culminating event of the program, Antioch and Lakeview students travelled together to The Hermitage. The high schoolers tutored the fourth graders about the history and agricultural production of The Hermitage. Students from both schools enjoyed the experience and learned a lot through this in-depth, hands-on interaction.

Investing in America’s Future plan praises academy model

President Obama’s administration and the United States Department of Education have proposed a strategy for educational policy that prioritizes rigor and relevance in America’s schools. The plan is Investing in America’s Future: A Blueprint for Transforming Career and Technical Education (the full document is quite long, so feel free to glance through the summary). The plan calls on educational leaders and organizations to create opportunities that provide high-quality job-training opportunities in order to reduce skill shortages, encourage business growth, encourage new investment and job creation, and improve the longterm financial and economic health of citizens and the country as a whole.U.S. department education obama administration investing in america's future

The Investing in America’s Future plan specifically recommends the career academy model as one of the most effective means by which to make a lasting impact on individual students’ lives and the overall economic and financial health of a community. According to the brief, “The strength of career academies is their ability to make education more relevant to students through personalized and contextual learning, while preparing students for continuing education at the postsecondary level and for successful careers.”

The Obama administration and Department of Education are pushing for a new version of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 (Perkins Act). This law is the primary source of federal funding for career and technical education (CTE) programs. The president’s plan proposes a $1 billion competitive fund over three years (starting in fiscal year 2013) to increase the number of high-quality career academies in the United States.

The brief on career academies makes a strong argument for this model of education:

Rigorous evaluations of career academies across the country have demonstrated that offering students academically rigorous curricula embedded in career-related programs can reduce high school drop-out rates and prepare students for high-earning and high-skilled careers. Data have shown that high school students who graduate from career academies make on average 11 percent more per year than their non-career academy counterparts. Young men, a group that has faced a serious decline in earnings in recent years, make 17 percent more annually than young men who did not graduate from career academies. Higher earnings help our overall economy, increasing consumer spending and strengthening the middle class.

This focus on career academies comes with three principal goals: 1) improve student achievement and reduce drop-out rates, 2) increase postsecondary attainment, and 3) help industries hire American workers.

Nashville has a wonderful head start in this innovative educational paradigm. Twelve MNPS zoned high schools have career academies that give our students access to real-world learning opportunities and hands-on experience in high-wage, high-demand careers in middle Tennessee. The U.S. Department of Education even visited Hillwood High School to learn more about the excellent strides Nashville is making. Nashville is poised to take the lead in the national movement to improve educational outcomes.

Investing in America’s Future and the Academies of Nashville

President Obama’s administration and the United States Department of Education have proposed a strategy for educational policy that prioritizes rigor and relevance in America’s schools. The plan is Investing in America’s Future: A Blueprint for Transforming Career and Technical Education (the full document is quite long, so feel free to glance through the summary). The plan calls on educational leaders and organizations to create opportunities that provide high-quality job-training opportunities in order to reduce skill shortages, encourage business growth, encourage new investment and job creation, and improve the longterm financial and economic health of citizens and the country as a whole.U.S. department education obama administration investing in america's future

Along with the Investing in America’s Future plan, the Obama administration and Department of Education are pushing for a new version of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 (Perkins Act). This law is the primary source of federal funding for career and technical education (CTE) programs. The president’s proposal for a new, revised Perkins Act hopes to improve the quality and capacity for career and technical education by focusing on four core principals: alignment, collaboration, accountability, and innovation.

The Academies of Nashville already are poised to benefit and excel within the parameters of this plan and proposed legislation. Our model relies on aligning the economic needs and workforce development goals of the middle Tennessee economy with the instructional methods used in our classrooms and the educational needs of our students. The Academies are thriving due to meaningful collaboration with a wide range of dedicated community partners. Our community partners drive a sense of accountability by having a direct impact on the schools through high-level program development. The Academies of Nashville are fueling innovation by giving students first-hand experience in industry and putting them into contact with leading professionals across a variety of fields.

Nashville’s high schools are at the leading edge of high-quality education that is responsive to the needs of our community. We look forward to leading the way as the rest of the nation looks to us as a model of how education is being made relevant in the twenty-first century.

Lisa Bonelli of McGavock wins Assistant Principal of the Year

McGavock High School‘s Lisa Bonelli won Assitant Principal of the Year at the 2012 Academies of Nashville Awards on Monday, May 14. She is the Assistant Principal in charge of the Gaylord Entertainment Academy of Hospitality and the US Community Credit Union Academy of Business and Finance. As an academy principal, she helps students take ownership of their learning by facilitating real-world learning experiences with community business partners. When she accepted the award, Bonelli stated her primary goal: “Our children knowing what they want to do in life when they’re done with school is what it’s all about.”

McGavock Assistant Principal Lisa Bonelli

Assistant Principal Lisa Bonelli cuts ribbon at opening of U.S. Community Credit Union branch in McGavock High School

This year, Lisa Bonelli has worked tirelessly to help prepare the Gaylord Entertainment Academy of Hospitality and Finance for the national accreditation process that is conducted by the National Career Academy Coalition. Bonelli strives to identify the strengths of each team members in order to work with them to achieve specific goals, such as the implementation of the National Standards of Practice. Target goals for her academies this year included improving student attendance, reducing office referrals for specific “at-risk” groups of students, and implementing proven student interventions.

Lisa Bonelli believes in the transforming power of a personal touch in education. This school year, she has demonstrated her personal commitment to building success by visiting every classroom and shaking the hand of every student in her academies. She wants to empower students and staff to achieve common goals by showing them that she is serving in her role as academy principal to support the common mission of the academies.

The Nashville Chamber of Commerce presented the 2012 Academies of Nashville Awards with the support of sponsors Deloitte and Altria. The awards were determined through a vote of MNPS administrators and executive staff, school board members, teachers, and community partners. These nominations were based on the National Career Academy Coalition‘s National Standards of Practice.

Job shadowing behind the scenes at the Bridgestone Arena

Job shadowing gives students the opportunity to see the realities of a profession or industry and the connections between learning and the real world. Students from Antioch High School‘s Academy of Hospitality visited the Bridgestone Arena to see how the events crew sets up for a concert. The students watched as crews prepared the arena for the event and learned about the complex planning required to run a successful concert. Then, they were able to stay for the Country Music Hall of Fame‘s We’re All for the Hall benefit concert, featuring Keith Urban, Vince Gill, and more. In this post, Jamesha B. writes about the experience.

Antioch students job shadowing Bridgestone Arena 2012

My name is Jamesha Buchanan and I am a student in the Academy of Hospitality at Antioch High School. On Tuesday, April 10, 2012, a few of my classmates and I went to Bridgestone Arena to job shadow the event coordinator, Danny Butler. We toured the whole arena and got to see the entire behind-the-scenes actions for the concert, We’re All For The Hall. It was amazing to see how every little thing has a big part in the event, from the floors on the upper levels being clean to the sign language interpreter having a stand for his papers. It was a great experience seeing everybody in action when it was time to open the doors. I will never forget that day, especially because it was my first time attending a concert!

Steve Chauncy of Hillwood wins Executive Principal of the Year

Hillwood High School’s Dr. Steve Chauncy won Executive Principal of the Year at the 2012 Academies of Nashville Awards on Monday, May 14. As executive principal, Dr. Steve Chauncy has led with a strong vision of every Hillwood student graduating high school with a solid plan for a successful life in college and careers. The school currently has three academies that are undergoing the process for national accreditation by the National Career Academy Coalition. While accepting the award, Dr. Steve Chauncy spoke confidently about his school’s candidacy: “Building the Academies at Hillwood has been a process. I’m confident that our school is on the verge of being nationally recognized.”Dr. Steve Chauncy executive principal Hillwood High School

Dr. Chauncy has prioritized personnel and technology in implementing the academy model of project-based learning at Hillwood High School. Hiring and retaining quality teachers has been crucial to the success of the flourishing Academies at Hillwood. Dr. Steve Chauncy helped launch a personal laptop program in his school that has put computers in the hands of more than six hundred Hillwood students, an initiative that has transformed the role of technology in instruction.

Hillwood has enjoyed wonderful success over the past few years under Dr. Steve Chauncy’s leadership in the Academies of Nashville program. During the last three years, the school’s graduation rate as increased by twenty percent. Students are enjoying the benefits of real-world learning opportunities, job shadowing, and internships with Hillwood’s academy partners. Some students are even pursuing professional certifications while still in school. The academic rigor at the school remains high with more than 20 Advanced Placement courses, the Academic Scholars Program, ACT preparation programs, and full inclusionary practices for exceptional education students.

The Nashville Chamber of Commerce presented the 2012 Academies of Nashville Awards with the support of sponsors Deloitte and Altria. The awards were determined through a vote of MNPS administrators and executive staff, school board members, teachers, and community partners. These nominations were based on the National Career Academy Coalition‘s National Standards of Practice.

Teacher team externship with Meharry Medical College

The Academies of Nashville provide students with meaningful, hands-on learning in context. Inquiry-based teaching and project-based learning are important for the Academies’ goal of teaching students how to think critically and creatively to solve problems in the classroom and real world. To bring these ideas to MNPS classrooms, academy partners in Nashville have joined forces with the Academies of Nashville to educate teachers about the realities of working life in different careers. The result of this collaboration is the Teacher Team Externship Program. The program is an opportunity for teachers to have a real-world professional experience at a host organization to develop a project-based curriculum that gives students industry exposure and applied learning. A teacher team works together to create interdisciplinary projects that reinforce the theme of their academy across subject areas.

Academies of Nashville Glencliff High School teacher team externship

In 2011, a teacher team from Glencliff High School‘s Academy of Medical Science & Research participated in an externship with Meharry Medical College. The teacher’s focused their attention on how healthcare affects the entire community. They decided that they wanted their interdisciplinary curriculum to reflect the importance of raising awareness and educating the public about healthy living.

The teacher team from the Academy of Medical Science & Research decided to have their students create a community-based diabetes awareness 5k race, the Stampede Against Diabetes. The race supported the valuable work of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation and the American Diabetes Association. Over fifty people ran in the race through the Woodbine community in south Nashville. Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital, Dialysis Clinic Inc., Youth Villages, and Meharry Medical College supported the 5k race.

Glencliff Academy of Medical Science Research 5k diabetes teacher team externship

This race was an interdisciplinary project for students in the Academy of Medical Science & Research.  Throughout the school year, students researched the causes, prevalence, prevention, and impact of diabetes. They listened to guest speakers from various organizations that gave presentations on different aspects of diabetes and its impact on American society. Numerous classes had assignments that focused on diabetes. In English, students researched the disease and created informational pamphlets. In Life Connections and Child & Lifespan Development, students evaluated case studies of individuals with diabetes and created materials to raise awareness. In various science classes, students analyzed the environmental factors that show a significant relationship to diabetes as well as the genetics and cellular effects of diabetes. In Government, students participated in a public policy simulation on diabetes funding and research that included role plays and letters to representatives. In other words, students had the opportunity to focus their learning in many different subjects through the lens of diabetes and its relationship to public health. More importantly, they took active steps to bring their knowledge to the community and make a difference.

Brenda Gilmore of Tennessee House of Representatives honored at Academies of Nashville Awards

Representative Brenda Gilmore of the Tennessee House of Representatives was honored at the 2012 Academies of Nashville Awards on May 14, 2012 with the Chamber’s Choice Award. The Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce recognized Representative Gilmore for her legislative support of flexibility and modernization of Career and Technical Education (CTE). Brenda Gilmore was the House sponsor for key state legislation that paved the way for the creation of academy teacher teams in MNPS high schools. Her bill allowed CTE courses to have the same class size as other high school courses, a measure of flexibility that made it possible to incorporate CTE classes into the master schedule more easily. The legislation was sponsored in the Senate by Joe Haynes.Brenda Gilmore Tennessee House Representatives 2012 Academies Nashville Awards

Brenda Gilmore was elected to the Tennessee House of Representatives in 2006 to represent district 54. She previously served eight years in the Nashville Metropolitan Council. She holds an undergraduate degree in Business from Tennessee State University and the Master of Human Resource Development from Vanderbilt University. Her career has spanned across education and public service. While accepting the Chamber’s Choice Award, Gilmore pointed to the need to connect education with students’ reality and aspirations. She also reflected on the importance of caring, high-quality teachers in helping students to find their way during the critical high school years: “Every child who has that special teacher in his or her life has opportunity.”

The Nashville Chamber of Commerce presented the 2012 Academies of Nashville Awards with the support of sponsors Deloitte and Altria. The awards were determined through a vote of MNPS administrators and executive staff, school board members, teachers, and community partners. These nominations were based on the National Career Academy Coalition‘s National Standards of Practice.

 

Learning entrepreneurship at Deloitte through Junior Achievement

Junior Achievement helps connect MNPS high school students in the Academies of Nashville with real-world learning opportunities at local businesses in Nashville. These hands-on experiences working alongside local professionals provide focus and motivation for our high school students. Samuel N. is a student in Antioch High School‘s Tennessee Credit Union Academy of Business and Finance. He writes about learning entrepreneurship in Junior Achievement’s Company Program at Deloittethis year.

Antioch students Junior Achievement Company Program Deloitte

Students participate in Junior Achievement's Company Program at Deloitte

My name is Samuel and I am a Marketing and Management student and DECA member at Antioch High School. I participated in the 16-week Junior Achievement Company program this year. We were mentored by three amazing volunteers from Deloitte who guided us through the business planning and implementation process. I enjoyed the whole experience of learning entrepreneurship because I know the lessons learned along the way will help me with my future business ventures.

The best part of participating in this program was our second trip to Deloitte. We met many entrepreneurs and high ranking people in the company. For example, we talked to Larry Quinlan and Peter Mays who were very extraordinary and motivational. Another speaker we had at Deloitte was Homer Britton, a graduate of Antioch High School. We also had some guest speakers from the community that came and gave us advice on our business. At the end of the day, we presented our business to a room full of business people. It was a little scary, but it went really well and we had a lot of positive feedback.

Overall the JA Company program was fun and informational, and I plan on participating in it again next year. Hopefully, next year we can make some more money!

Teacher team externship with Vanderbilt Center for Science Outreach

The Academies of Nashville provide students with meaningful, hands-on learning in context. Inquiry-based teaching and project-based learning are important for the Academies’ goal of teaching students how to think critically and creatively to solve problems in the classroom and real world. To bring these ideas to MNPS classrooms, academy partners in Nashville have joined forces with the Academies of Nashville to educate teachers about the realities of working life in different careers. The result of this collaboration is the Teacher Team Externship Program. The program is an opportunity for teachers to have a real-world professional experience at a host organization to develop a project-based curriculum that gives students industry exposure and applied learning. A teacher team works together to create interdisciplinary projects that reinforce the theme of their academy across subject areas.

Academies of Nashville Stratford STEM High School

In June 2011, teachers from Stratford STEM Magnet High School’s Academy of Science and Engineering and Hillsboro High School’s Academy of Global Health and Science worked with the Vanderbilt Center for Science Outreach. The teacher team focused on creating coursework that addresses real-world problems and challenges that can be addressed through scientific inquiry. During the first week, the teacher team collected samples to test water quality in Richland Creek and Cooper Creek. Using these samples, the teachers studied the relationships between macroinvertebrates, water chemistry, microbiology, nanotechnology, infectious diseases, and forensic geology. In the second week, the teachers worked on forensic science, meteorology, entomology, and diabesity. The goal of this wide variety of activities was to help the instructors see how these different fields of scientific inquiry intersect in real-world application.

Academies of Nashville Hillsboro High School

This teacher team participated in these activities to develop coursework and lesson modules that will support the Interdisciplinary Science and Research Program at Stratford and Hillsboro. The goal of this program is to introduce students to core scientific principles in the first two years of high school so that these students can move on to advanced, independent research in the final two years of high school. By encouraging students to move from passive learning of information to actively discovering through experimentation and laboratory work, this program is working toward the full integration of STEM education into the science curriculum at Hillsboro and Stratford.

Learning a language and healthcare at Hillwood

In February 2012, the U.S. Department of Education‘s Assistant Secretary for Vocational and Adult Education, Dr. Brend Dann-Messier, visited Hillwood High School. The purpose of Dr. Dann-Messier’s visit was to learn about the Academies of Nashville program and how the academy model has been implemented across MNPS and at Hillwood in particular. Students at Hillwood wrote letters to Dr. Dann-Messier to describe how their academies have changed their outlook on education and prepared them for college and career. The letter that follows was written by Zahraa A., a senior in the Academy of Health Sciences. She writes about moving to the United States, learning English, and learning about the healthcare industry.Hillwood student healthcare Academy health sciences Nashville

My name is Zahraa Abdulameer. I am a senior at Hillwood High School, and I am the HOSA Club President. I moved to the United States in 2008. I knew little to no English. My first year was a challenge that I successfully overcame. I was attending a different high school in Nashville as a freshman. However, because of my interests, I researched schools that offered healthcare-related classes and found Hillwood. I moved to Hillwood as a sophomore and enrolled in the Academy of Health Sciences. I took many classes that were healthcare-related like health science education, medical therapeutics, dual enrollment medical terminology, dual enrollment anatomy, emergency medical services, and a clinical internship. It was like climbing a ladder; I took it step by step and learned a lot.

Learning the language while studying these subjects was challenging; however, with my dedication and the support of the health science teachers, I achieved what I have today. Taking the dual enrollment classes was one of the best things about the health academy. I gained a lot of knowledge in these classes and received college credits. The Academy of Health Sciences helped me as a person, not only academically, but on a deeper level. I learned how to lead and be in charge, I learned to express my opinions, and, most importantly, I learned that I can accomplish my dream of being a doctor. I want to be a cardiac surgeon. I was uncertain about my skills and abilities, but the health academy gave me the confidence and support I need.

I’m currently interning at Centennial Medical Center ICU. The experience I get there is beyond words. I observe the hospital environment closely instead of just learning about it in books. This internship has affected me greatly. This experience adds to my knowledge and allows me to experience patient care firsthand. I have been able to participate and ask questions about patient diagnosis as well. As a senior, I feel I am well prepared to enter college. I have the background knowledge that makes me more certain when I choose my major.

Finally, the HOSA Club has influenced me greatly. I learned how to be independent yet a good team player. Through the HOSA Club, I was able to attend the HOSA National Leadership Conference in Anaheim, CA. Attending a conference at my age was something I never dreamed of experiencing, but HOSA provided the opportunity.

I truly feel the Academy of Health Sciences has shaped who I am today. It provided me with knowledge that I will carry for the rest of my life. It also made me learn about myself through experiencing different situations. It made my future more visible and clear. I feel fortunate to be an Academy of Health Sciences student at Hillwood High School

Nurse training at Hillwood Academy of Health Sciences

In February 2012, the U.S. Department of Education‘s Assistant Secretary for Vocational and Adult Education, Dr. Brend Dann-Messier, visited Hillwood High School. The purpose of Dr. Dann-Messier’s visit was to learn about the Academies of Nashville program and how the academy model has been implemented across MNPS and at Hillwood in particular. Students at Hillwood wrote letters to Dr. Dann-Messier to describe how their academies have changed their outlook on education and prepared them for college and career. The letter that follows was written by Christiana C., a senior in the Academy of Health Sciences. She writes about how her academy has given her nurse training in a hands-on learning environment.Hillwood Academies Nashville nurse training

I am Christiana from Hillwood High School, and I aspire to become a nurse. I come from a very loving and caring family, but my family lacks the ability to provide financial needs. If it weren’t for my Health Science classes, I never would have been given the opportunity to try and achieve my Certified Nursing Assistant Certification. I am in clinical now through the Nursing Education class and will have the appropriate number of clinical hours to sit for my test at the end of the school year, which is my senior year in high school. Through these classes in nurse training I have obtained numerous skills that I will be able to utilize in the field of nursing.

If you were to compare the person I was before high school to the person I am now, I have a much better likelihood of going to college and becoming a nurse. Academy of Health Sciences gave me hope of achieving my goals and kept me focused on my future. Nursing is an extremely competitive field, and being in this academy has put me a step ahead of everyone else. I’ve taken Medical Terminology, Emergency Medical Services, Advanced Placement, Dual Enrollment, and tons of other classes that I feel have prepared me to be a successful nurse. I’ve been given numerous opportunities to do things that I’d never have done without this academy. I have participated in job shadowing, paid and unpaid internships, and actual patient care.

I have been accepted to Lipscomb University, where I plan to pursue nursing. I feel the nursing classes will be less challenging for me with the many experiences in nurse training I have received in high school. No matter where life leads me, I’ll never forget the things the Academy of Health Sciences and especially Ms. Myrick have done for me. Plenty of doors have been opened, and I even have the chance to further improve my nursing skills and become a Certified Nursing Assistant along with attending college. I have built relationships at the facilities where I have had the opportunity to intern and, if I am successful at passing my test to earn my CNA certificate, I could possibly get a job at one of those facilities. I go off campus for my Nursing Education and Clinical Internship classes. I intern at the Blakeford Nursing Home for nursing class and Centennial Medical Center for the internship class. I enjoy forming a relationship with possible future employers. This is all thanks to the Academy of Health Sciences.

Not everyone has the opportunities I’ve had; however, they should. I’m a much better person, and I feel I’ll be a much better nurse, thanks to the Academy of Health Sciences and the nurse training available to me. I know you learn something new every day, as a nurse. I also know that not every day is the same. I really enjoy the fact that we get to go to the Blakeford and perform hands-on patient care. If it wasn’t for the Academy of Health Sciences, and the facilities that work with us, I’d be an average student. I have much more confidence as a student and as a prospective nurse.

Job shadowing in health technology at HealthTeacher

Job shadowing is a cornerstone of hands-on learning in the Academies of Nashville. Job shadowing helps to connect students and their interests with the business community. Students get the opportunity to learn about professional life in the real world alongside our community partners. Shantel H. is a student in Cane Ridge High School‘s Academy of Health Management. Shantel recently participated in job shadowing with HealthTeacher, an Academy Partner that works to bring awareness of healthy living and wellness through strategic partnerships.

Academies of Nashville Cane Ridge High School job shadowing If I could give a grade for my job shadowing experience, it would have to be an A+. I really enjoyed myself and learned a lot of new things. The main thing HealthTeacher does is to prevent children and teenagers from becoming obese. The company sends a representative to the surrounding hospitals to sell the program to the hospital, and then the hospital sponsors the program to all of the surrounding schools in the district. These schools get a class that allows students to learn how to become healthy and explore all the different qualities in the program.

I would like to thank the people of HealthTeacher for allowing me to see what they do in an everyday routine. Instead of just sitting in a room learning about everything, I had a hands-on experience. In periods of about 20 minutes to 45 minutes, I spoke with a group of people or just one person to learn about what they do. In each group you could ask questions or answer questions that they asked. For instance, at HealthTeacher the Technical Team who helps build up the website have a 15-minute meeting every morning  to discuss what they did yesterday and what the goal is for the day.

Even though I got lost in half of the things they were talking about, I still learned how the website is built up. Along with that I talked to the president of the whole company. I also learned about the business side of the company and how they manage the number of people that log on and use the lessons. The one thing I really learned was how health can tie into everything. For instance, in the Art Department they create poster boards that display healthy choices and positive messages. This allows children and teenagers to see what healthy eating and being healthy looks like.

Technology plays a major role at HealthTeacher and how it functions. In every office and conference room there is something high-tech. From the laptops to the TV’s and even the mouse pads, everything is very high-tech. One of the most used products at HealthTeacher is the Mac. I could really see myself working there in the future. It is an amazing program and it should be used not only in Metro Schools but in schools all over the country.