McGavock High School

2017 Academies of Nashville Award Nominees

The Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce has announce the final category nominees for the 2017 Academies of Nashville Awards. In its seventh year, this event recognizes the hard work of individuals, smaller learning communities and companies playing an integral role in the success of the Academies model.

Since 2010, more than 350 MNPS educators, administrators and Academy partners have received special recognition through this initiative. This year, nearly 306 nominations were received illustrating excellence within the Academies. These submissions were reviewed and vetted through the final nominations committee comprised of MNPS leadership, Nashville Chamber, PENCIL and Alignment Nashville leadership teams. The final winners will be selected by a panel of independent judges and announced at Rocketown during the awards dinner on April 24th from 4:30 p. m. – 7:30 p.m. This is an invite-only event sponsored by The Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce and other generous business partners.

 

The 2017 final nominees are as follows: 

 

Academy Teacher of the Year (CTE or Thematic Pathway) 

Kathleen Homer, Antioch High School -The Tennessee Credit Union Academy of Business & Finance

Lonny Nelson, Hillsboro High School- Academy of Global Health & Science

Brad Tracy, McGavock High School- Aegis Sciences Corporation Academy of Life Science & Law

Denise Wiggington, Overton High School- Academy of Health Sciences

Dr. Garry Gibson, Whites Creek High School- Academy of Alternative Energy, Sustainability, & Logistics

 

Academy Teacher of the Year (General & Global Education) 

Thomas Thorps, Cane Ridge High School- Academy of Arts & Communication

Katherine Short Forsthoff, Glencliff High School- The Ford Academy of Business & Innovation

Scott Bennett, Hillsboro High School- Academy of International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

Judith C. Lundy, McGavock High School- The CMT Academy of Digital Design & Communication

Rachael Hunt, Pearl Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School- Academy of Entertainment Management

 

Academy Team Leader of the Year 

Adam Guidry, Glencliff High School- Hands on Nashville Academy of Environmental & Urban Planning

Marc Taylor, Hillwood High School- Academy of Art, Design, & Communication

Jason Proffitt, Hunters Lane High School- Academy of Health & Human Services

Adam Lightman, McGavock High School- Academy of Aviation & Transportation

Sally Spear, Overton High School- Academy of Engineering

 

Externship Project of the Year 

Conexion Americas, Glencliff High School- Academy of Medical Science & Research

Vanderbilt Center for Latin American Studies, Hillsboro High School- Academy of International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

Doerfer Industries and Universal Robotics, Stratford STEM School- Academy of Science & Engineering

 

Freshman Academy of the Year 

Hillwood High School 

Overton High School 

Stratford STEM School 

 

Academy of the Year 

McGavock High School- Academy of Aviation & Transportation 

Pearl Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School- Academy of Entertainment Management 

Whites Creek High School- Academy of Education & Law 

 

Academy Counselor of the Year 

Joseph Levickis, Hunters Lane High School- Griffin Academy of Design & Technology

Amy LeVally Glancy, McGavock High School- Academy of Aviation & Transportation

Deborah Osborne, Pearl Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School- Academy of Entertainment Management

 

Academy Coach of the Year 

Brad Meyer, Hunters Lane High School

Jacob Glancy, McGavock High School

LaSheryl Jones-Hall, Whites Creek High School

 

Academy Assistant Principal of the Year 

Suzanne Link, Glencliff High School- Academy of Medical Science & Research

Russell Young, Hunters Lane High School- Academy of Health & Human Services

Marvin L. Olige, Maplewood High School- Academy of Sports Medicine & Wellness

Vincent Jones, Stratford STEM School- Academy of National Safety & Security Technologies

Matthew Patterson, Whites Creek High School- Academy of Education & Law

 

Executive Principal of the Year 

Jill Pittman, Overton High School

Sonia Stewart, Pearl Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School

James Bailey, Whites Creek High School

 

Academy Partnership of the Year: Arts, Media & Communications 

Lightning 1OO, Pearl Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School- Academy of Entertainment Communication

NECAT (Nashville Education, Community, and Arts Television), Hillsboro High School- US Community Credit Union Academy of International Business & Communication

The Recording Academy – The Grammys, Pearl Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School- Academy of Entertainment Communication

 

Academy Partnership of the Year: Marketing & IT 

Ford Motor Credit, Glencliff High School- The Ford Academy of Business & Innovation

Deloitte, Antioch High School -The Tennessee Credit Union Academy of Business & Finance

HCA, Overton High School- Academy of Information Technology

 

Academy Partnership of the Year: Engineering, Manufacturing & Industrial Technology 

Nissan North America, Stratford STEM School- Academy of Science & Engineering

Cummins, Inc., McGavock High School- Academy of Aviation & Transportation

Stansell Electric, Inc., Maplewood High School- Academy of Energy & Power

 

Academy Partnership of the Year: Health & Public Services 

TN National Guard, Cane Ridge High School- Academy of Law

Aegis Sciences Corporation, McGavock High School- Aegis Sciences Corporation Academy of Life Science & Law

St. Thomas Health Services, Maplewood High School- Academy of Sports Medicine & Wellness

 

Academy Partnership of the Year: Hospitality & Tourism 

Nashville Airport Hotel, Antioch High School- Academy of Hospitality & Marketing

Holiday Inn Express Antioch, Antioch High School- Academy of Hospitality & Marketing

Music City Center, Hunters Lane High School- Academy of Hospitality

What Is Our Story?

From state take-over to national model. 

During the 2006-2007 school year, the Academies of Nashville was only a dream– an ambitious, high school transformation effort that would bring together families, educators, and the community to improve our schools.

Ten years later, that dream has come to fruition. Graduation rates have increased. Student attendance is at an all-time high. Discipline referrals have significantly dropped. Business engagement in the school system has never been stronger and more powerful.

But there is much more to this success than the statistics along. It is the stories that touch our hearts. This past month, the Academies of Nashville were able to celebrate their ten year anniversary at Nissan Stadium with 300 of its closest friends and partners. Partners were also able to sign a recommitment statement with PENCIL to commit to the work ahead in the next ten years. Academies of Nashville graduates Shakarah Nelson, Katherine Hernandez, and Ben Zolkower shared their stories of how their high school education impacted their future.

Thank you to everyone who helped make this event, and the past ten years, a success. We specifically want to thank our founding partners Alignment Nashville, Ford NGL, the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce, PENCIL, and the Ford Hub. We appreciate you.

To see and hear more about the event, check out the coverage by WSMV here.

 

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Academy Coaches from the past ten years pose with a commemorative Hatch Show Print. Academy Coaches act as the business partner liaison for schools in the Academy model.

 

Microsoft displayed some of its newest technology to assist partners in recommitting to the work of the Academies of Nashville.

Microsoft displayed some of its newest technology to assist partners in recommitting to the work of the Academies of Nashville.

 

Every business partner and school employee in attendance received a commemorative Hatch Show Print to recognize the work of the past decade in the Academies of Nashville.

Every business partner and school employee in attendance received a commemorative Hatch Show Print to recognize the work of the past decade in the Academies of Nashville.

 

Academies graduates shared their stories of how the Academies of Nashville impacted their education. Throughout the evening, Jody Lenz recorded their inspiring messages through graphic listening.

Academies of Nashville graduates shared their stories of how the Academies of Nashville impacted their education. Throughout the evening, Jody Lenz recorded their inspiring messages through graphic listening.

Cheers, Tears, and Celebrating Ten Years

This year is the Academies of Nashville 10-Year Anniversary!

While we will be celebrating all year long, we hosted a special presentation at the December Administrative and Supervisory Meeting last week. Hear from students from each of the Academies of Nashville schools on how the academies have helped their pursue their college and career goals.

Nnadozie Ibe, Antioch High School, Tennessee Credit Union Academy of Business and Finance

 

Jarad McCray, Cane Ridge High School, Academy of Law

Reanas Saleh, Glencliff High School, Hands On Nashville Academy of Environmental and Urban Planning

Olivia Zavitson, Hillsboro High School, US Community Credit Union Academy of International Business and Communication

Tevion Turner, Hillwood High School, Academy of Health Sciences

Alanna Brown, Hunters Lane High School, Academy of International Baccalaureate

BreeAnna Collins, Maplewood High School, Academy of Sports Medicine and Wellness

Victor Ochoa, McGavock High School, Gaylord Entertainment Academy of Hospitality

Khai Hardin, Overton High School, Academy of Information Technology

Jacob Graham, Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School, Academy of Entertainment Communication

Jack Utley, Stratford STEM Magnet High School, Academy of Science and Engineering

Jacob Williams, Whites Creek High School, Academy of Community Health

Championing Career Academies

Metro Schools was recognized by the National Career Academy Coalition (NCAC) for being a champion of the career academy model, marked by small learning communities, college-prep curriculum with career themes and partnerships with local employers, higher education institutions and the community. Several schools as well as community partners were honored at the NCAC conference held in Tampa earlier this month.

McGavock High School Receives Jeffrey N. Stein Award

The Jeffrey N. Stein Award recognizes a school with career academies that demonstrates an extraordinary commitment to and passion for career academies as catalysts for helping all students, and especially disadvantaged students, according to Susan Katzman, recent past-president of the National Career Academy Coalition.

“I had the pleasure of knowing Jeffrey Stein for many years, and as a businessman and an educator, he exemplified passion, commitment and the pursuit of excellence. He did not do anything if he could not do it well. His widow Judy and a former executive director of NCAC wanted to create an award in his honor for schools that exhibit the same qualities,” said Katzman. “I am pleased to present this year’s award to McGavock High School in Nashville, Tennessee. They began the career academy process in 2008 and perfected their work over the next eight years. They have model academies, numerous business partners and successful students. You cannot google McGavock without seeing a YouTube video of President Obama visiting and speaking at the school in 2013.”

Meharry Medical College and Bridgestone Americas Receive Partnership Awards

Also recognized at the NCAC conference were Meharry Medical College and Bridgestone Americas, which both received the Henk Koning Exemplary Partnership Award for their continued support and partnerships with academies in Metro Schools.

Dr. Susan DeRiemer, a professor at Meharry Medical College has led Meharry’s partnership with the Glencliff High School Academy of Medical Science & Research (AMSR) almost since its beginning. Meharry, founded in 1876, is one of the oldest and largest historically black medical colleges in the United States that has always focused on training talented individuals from challenging socio-economic backgrounds and prepared them to go into underserved areas to work. Highlights of the partnership includes:

  • Externships for the academy teachers;
  • Curricular support throughout the course of the school year to carry out the project based learning endeavors;
  • Medical Interpreting pathway (started in 2014) that was co-written by Dr. DeRiemer and members of the AMSR faculty. This curriculum is the first of its kind in the nation and has been adopted by the Tennessee Department of Education as an approved pathway.

Bridgestone Americas has embraced the Academy of Entrepreneurship and Innovation, even exposing the students to international business leaders from Japan and South America, supporting students to develop beyond basic mechanic skills and become potential corporate executives. Highlights of the partnership with Maplewood High School include:

  • Transforming Maplewood’s high school automotive shop into a one-of-a-kind automotive training center in cooperation with Firestone Complete Auto Care. This included building an official Customer Service Center inside the school and providing students with access to and training on the proprietary software used in the Firestone organization;
  • Enhancing course offerings by encouraging all students to take at least one course in Marketing and Management;
  • Investing more than $300,000 in building the Firestone training center, the organization provides 2 to 3 staff members on a regular basis every couple of weeks to provide industry training to students.

Thirteen Metro Schools Receive NCAC Accreditation

In addition, the following Metro schools officially received NCAC Accreditation during the conference:

  1. Cane Ridge High School – Academy of Health Management
  2. Glencliff High School – Academy of Medical Science and Research
  3. Hillsboro High School – Academy of Global Health and Science
  4. Hillwood High School – Academy of Health Science
  5. Hillwood High School – Academy of Business and Hospitality
  6. Hillwood High School – Academy of Art, Design, and Communication
  7. Maplewood High School – Academy of Energy and Power
  8. McGavock High School – US Community Credit Union/ Gaylord Entertainment Academy of Hospitality and Finance
  9. McGavock High School – CMT Academy of Digital Design and Communication
  10. McGavock High School – Aegis Sciences Corporation Academy of Life Science and Law
  11. McGavock High School – Academy of Aviation and Transportation
  12. Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School – Academy of Entertainment Management
  13. Whites Creek High School – Academy of Education and Law

For more information on the National Career Academy Coalition, visit http://www.ncacinc.com.

Saint Thomas Health Scholars Program Puts Students on Career Path to Healthcare

Originally posted to Saint Thomas Health Beat

It was a night to shine. It was a night to celebrate. One hundred students from nine high schools with health & science academies in Metro Nashville were selected to the Saint Thomas Health Scholars Program. The program, one of the first of its kind in the nation, provides mentoring and hands-on experience in the healthcare field in hopes of paving a career path for these seniors once they graduate from high school. The program also prepares them to take the certification exam at the end of the school year to become a medical assistant. All this at no charge to the students and their families.

Saint Thomas Health, a part of Ascension, partnered with Metro Nashville Public Schools for this inaugural program. A special event was held at Saint Thomas Midtown Hospital in Nashville to commission the students into the program.

Audio Production Students compete in Skills USA

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What Is Skills USA?

Skills USA is a convention for students to compete against each other by showcasing their professional and career abilities.
-Willow

What It Was Like To Compete

We were given a lot of freedom to create during competition. With only a simple prompt to follow, they would let us go out and record anywhere we wanted in the city. It was a lot of fun bouncing ideas off each other and having so much creative freedom.
-Jackson

Chattanooga Was Awesome

Chattanooga is such a beautiful city, its tasteful, timeless atmosphere made me feel right at home there. The relaxed, laid back scenery of the area was so calming it almost felt like a vacation!
-Willow

Getting to hang out with all the other students competing was also a ton of fun.
​-Jackson


What We Took Away From The Experience

I learned how enjoyable and satisfying it is to work on a professional level project and also the focus and work ethic it takes to pull one off.
Jackson

Learning not to have many expectations for any task before it is given was an important tool I picked up during competition. It prepared me for my career world while also simply giving me a good fundamental rule to live by.
-Willow


The Medals

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Hospitality and Business Experiential Learning at McGavock High School

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Hospitality & Tourism students visit Gaylord Opryland Hotel every year. Here are some students during a job shadow. They shadow employees of the hotel gaining experience and insight to the world of hospitality. They learn about all aspects of the hotel such as the front desk and human resources, which are pictured.

 

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Banking and Finance students benefit from having the U.S. Community Credit Union as a business partner. Pictured are banking and finance students discussing marketing tactics with the head of marketing for the USCCU, J.R. Jerningan. McGavock has a fully functioning branch of the USCCU inside the school where students work gaining banking experience while other students have to ability to open accounts and learn about financial responsibility.

 

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Entrepreneurship students benefit from having Deloitte as a business partner. Betsy Oleska, the Senior Engagement Manager at Deloitte is a member of the advisory board for the Academy of Hospitality and Finance. She helped to facilitate the job shadow for the students. They learned about consulting and auditing while there.

 

HTM 5

The culinary students help to prepare meals while at The Gaylord Opryland Hotel. They gain valuable experience in a real life culinary atmosphere. The students also create menus to serve to the staff at McGavock High School in their Bistro. Once a week, the teachers can go to the Bistro and enjoy a pre-fixed menu prepared and served by the students.

Personality comes with many names at McGavock HS CMT Academy of Digital Design and Technology

We’re the kids from McGavock’s Audio/Visual Production pathway. At least that’s what we think it’s called… It’s either that, or Broadcasting. We’re not sure… “Broadcasting” makes you think of old guys in suits reporting the Evening News, and we’re not really that.  And “A/V Production” makes you think about nerdy kids with pocket protectors. And we’re not really that either. Well, some of us are. Anyway, what we do know is that we learn how to make Television. How to write, produce, light, edit, and share video projects. Things like music videos, commercials, news programs, documentaries, web features, and short films. Some of the major projects we do every year are the DDC Awards Show, the Film Festival, and the Senior Showcase. We think our pathway is the best one in Nashville. And we’ve won awards that back up this claim. Now if we only knew what to call ourselves….

 

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Signarama Visits Digital Arts and Design Classes at McGavock

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Mr. Hinchman’s Digital Arts and Design II students at McGavock High School had the pleasure of hearing Greta Miller, of Signarama, speak about the graphic design industry in October. Ms. Miller, the production manager of the company, passed along valuable firsthand information to the students about the field and what it takes to become not only a graphic designer, but a highly-successful graphic designer. She also talked about the different software she uses on a daily basis, which is the same software the students use, and the importance of building relationships with customers.

McGavock students “rock” at Rocketown

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A group of students from McGavock’s audio production class had the opportunity to visit the full studio at Rocketown on a scheduled experiential learning day. With the prior help of teacher, Mr. Oquendo, the students were able to run a full session from beginning to end with little instruction.

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They used production software, Logic Pro X, which they have been trained to use during class-time. All students involved helped write a script for a commercial that Rocketown will use in the future and on their website. Each student took a turn running Logic and being in the sound booth. Back at the full studio in McGavock, the students will finish their project by writing a jingle and editing what they produced.

Congratulations to the 2016 Academy Awards Nominees

2016 NOMINEES

The following categories will be decided through an anonymous online ballot

 

Academy Partnership of the Year, Arts, Media & Communications

  • Frist Center For the Visual Arts and the Academy of Art, Design, & Communication at Hillwood High School
  • Stones River National Battlefield and the CMT Academy of Digital Design & Communication at McGavock High School
  • Warner Music Nashville and the Academy of Entertainment Management at Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School

 

Academy Partnership of the Year, Business, Marketing & IT

  • Bridgestone Americas, Inc. and the Academy of Entrepreneurship & Innovation at Maplewood High School
  • HCA IT&S and the Academy of Information Technology at Overton High School
  • The Tennessee Credit Union and the Tennessee Credit Union Academy of Business & Finance at Antioch High School

 

Academy Partnership of the Year, Engineering, Manufacturing & Industrial Technology

Presented by Nissan North America, Inc.

  • ACE Mentor and the Academy of Architecture & Construction at Cane Ridge High School
  • Cummins, Inc. and the Academy of Aviation and Transportation at McGavock High School
  • LP Corporation and the Academy of Alternative Energy, Sustainability & Logistics at Whites Creek High School

 

Academy Partnership of the Year, Hospitality & Tourism

  • Community Hospitality and the Academy of Business & Hospitality at Hillwood High School
  • Holiday Inn Express & Suites, Antioch and Academy of Hospitality & Marketing at Antioch High School
  • Omni Hotel and the Academy of Hospitality at Hunters Lane High School

 

Academy Partnership of the Year, Health & Public Services

  • American Red Cross and the Academy of Global Health & Science at Hillsboro High School
  • HCA/TriStar Health and the Academy of Health Science at Hillwood High School
  • Meharry Medical College and the Academy of Medical Science & Research at Glencliff High School

 

2016 Externship Project of the Year
Presented by The Memorial Foundation

  • Frist Center for the Visual Arts and the Academy of Art, Design, & Communication at Hillwood High School
  • Meharry Medical College and the Academy of Medical Science & Research at Glencliff High School
  • US Community Credit Union and the US Community Credit Union Academy of International Business & Communication at Hillsboro High School

 

Freshman Academy of the Year
Presented by Fifth Third

  • Hillwood Freshman Academy
  • Maplewood Freshman Academy
  • Stratford Freshman Academy

 

2016 Academy of the Year

  • Glencliff High School’s Hands On Nashville Academy of Environmental & Urban Planning
  • Hillwood High School’s Academy of Health Science
  • Maplewood High School’s Academy of Entrepreneurship & Innovation

  

The following categories will be decided by a judging panel of community leaders through blind vote.

 

Academy Teacher of the Year (CTE or Thematic Pathway)
Presented by Deloitte

  • Robert Kriebel with Antioch High School’s Tennessee Credit Union Academy of Business & Finance
  • Jeff Sherry with Hunters Lane High School’s Griffin Academy of Design & Technology
  • Jon Stephens with Stratford STEM Magnet High School’s Academy of National Safety & Security Technologies
  • Denise Wiggington with Overton High School’s Academy of Health Science
  • TJ Williams with Maplewood High School’s Academy of Entrepreneurship & Innovation

 

Academy Teacher of the Year (General Education)

  • Elizabeth Brewer with Glencliff High School’s Academy of Medical Science & Research
  • Sheree Cumberlander with Whites Creek High School’s Freshman Academy
  • Adam Lightman with McGavock High School’s Academy of Aviation & Transportation
  • Chad Prather with Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School’s Academy of Entertainment Management
  • Laticia Skae with Hillsboro High School’s Academy of Global Health & Science

 

Academy Team Leader of the Year

  • Deante Alexander with Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School’s Academy of Entertainment Management
  • Jeremiah Davis with Whites Creek High School’s Academy of Education & Law
  • Angela Lake with Maplewood High School’s Academy of Energy & Power
  • Martha Mitchell with McGavock High School’s CMT Academy of Digital Design & Communication
  • Jason Proffit with Hunters Lane High School’s Academy of Health & Human Science

 

Counselor of the Year

  • Amy LeVally, McGavock High School’s Academy of Aviation & Transportation
  • Stephanie Pate, Overton High School’s Academy of Engineering
  • Ashley Shaver, Hillwood High School’s Academy of Art, Design & Communication

  

Academy Coach of the Year 

  • Sonya Mansfield, Maplewood High School
  • Brad Meyers, Hunters Lane High School
  • Mary York, Overton High School

 

Academy Assistant Principal of the Year
Presented by Altria

  • Dr. Keely Jones-Mason, Maplewood High School’s Academy of Entrepreneurship & Innovation
  • Laura Lee Morin, McGavock High School’s Gaylord Entertainment Academy of Hospitality & Finance
  • Dr. Meghen Sanders, Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School’s Academy of Entertainment Communication
  • Stephen Shaeffer, Overton High School’s Academy of Event Marketing and Musical Performance
  • Russell Young, Hunters Lane High School’s Academy of Health & Human Services

 

Executive Principal of the Year Presented by Altria

  • James Bailey, Whites Creek High School
  • Michael Steele, Stratford STEM Magnet High School
  • Sonia Stewart, Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School

 

 

2015 Academies of Nashville Award Nominees

We are excited to celebrate the 5th year for the Academies of Nashville Awards! The Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce received more than 450 recommendations in 15 different categories. Every school was nominated at least once and eight schools had four or five nominations a piece. In partnership with the event sponsors, Altria, Interior Design Services, Deloitte, and the Memorial Foundation, we are pleased to announce the nominees for the 2015 Academies of Nashville Awards.

 

The following categories will be decided through an anonymous online ballot. 

Academy Partnership of the Year: Arts, Media, and Communications

  • Audio Engineering Society, Academy of Entertainment Communications, Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School
  • Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, Academy of Arts and Communications, Cane Ridge High School
  • HST Interior Elements, Academy of Art, Design, and Communications, Hillwood High School

Academy Partnership of the Year: Business, Marketing, and IT

  • Fifth Third Bank, Academy of Business and Consumer Services, Maplewood High School
  • Griffin Technology, Griffin Academy of Design and Technology, Hunters Lane High School
  • The Tennessee Credit Union, The Tennessee Credit Union Academy of Business and Finance, Antioch High School

Academy Partnership of the Year: Engineering, Manufacturing, and Industrial Technology

  • Hands On Nashville, Academy of Environmental and Urban Planning, Glencliff High School
  • LP Building Products, Academy of Alternative Energy, Sustainability, and Logistics, Whites Creek High School
  • Rogers Group, Academy of Architecture and Construction, Cane Ridge High School

Academy Partnership of the Year: Hospitality and Tourism

  • Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center, Gaylord Entertainment Academy of Hospitality, McGavock High School
  • Holiday Inn Opryland Airport, Academy of Hospitality and Marketing, Antioch High School
  • Omni Hotel, Academy of Hospitality, Hunters Lane High School

Academy Partnership of the Year: Health and Public Services

  • Aegis Sciences Corporation, Aegis Sciences Corporation Academy of Health Science and Law, McGavock High School
  • Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy, Academy of Health Science, Overton High School
  • Juvenile Court of Metropolitan Nashville and Davidson County, Academy of Law, Cane Ridge High School

Externship Project of the Year (Presented by the Memorial Foundation)

  • Flatt Rock Farms, Aegis Sciences Corporation Academy of Health Science and Law, McGavock High School
  • Meharry Medical College, Academy of Medical Science and Research, Glencliff High School
  • St. Thomas Health Services, Academy of Sports Medicine and Wellness, Maplewood High School

Freshman Academy of the Year

  • Glencliff High School Freshman Academy
  • Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School Freshman Academy
  • Whites Creek High School Freshman Academy

Academy of the Year

  • Antioch High School, Academy of Teaching and Service
  • Overton High School, Academy of Health Sciences
  • Stratford STEM Magnet High School, Academy of Science and Engineering

 

 

The following categories will be decided by a judging panel of community leaders through blind vote. 

Academy Teacher of the Year: CTE or Thematic Pathway (Presented by Deloitte)

  • Lauren Beck, Academy of Information Technology, Overton High School
  • Jeremiah Davis, Academy of Education and Law, Whites Creek High School
  • Jon Stephens, Academy of National Safety and Security Technologies, Stratford STEM Magnet High School
  • TJ Williams, Academy of Business and Consumer Services, Maplewood High School
  • Todd Young, Academy of Entertainment Communication, Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School

Academy Teacher of the Year: General and Global Education

  • Elijah Ammen, Academy of National Safety and Security Technologies, Stratford STEM Magnet High School
  • Paul Beavers, Freshman Academy, Hillsboro High School
  • Serena Moore, Academy of Education and Law, Whites Creek High School
  • Ryan Murphey, Academy of Sports Medicine and Wellness, Maplewood High School
  • Brittany Tharrington, Academy of Business and Hospitality, Hillwood High School

Academy Teach Leader of the Year

  • Tobey Green-Mayfield, Academy of National Safety and Security Technologies, Stratford STEM Magnet High School
  • Allyson Kreise, Academy of Entertainment Communication, Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School
  • Danette McMillan, Academy of Business and Consumer Services, Maplewood High School
  • Jason Proffitt, Academy of Health and Human Services, Hunters Lane High School
  • Josh Swartz, Academy of Global Health and Science, Hillsboro High School

Counselor of the Year

  • Adrienne McNew, Academy of Business and Marketing, MNPS Virtual School
  • Stephanie Pate, Academy of Engineering, Overton High School
  • Amanda Springer, CMT Academy of Digital Design and Communication, McGavock High School

Academy Coach of the Year

  • Jennifer Berry, Stratford STEM Magnet High School
  • Brad Meyers, Hunters Lane High School
  • Mary York, Overton High School

Academy Assistant Principal of the Year (Presented by Altria)

  • Celia Conley, Academy of Teaching and Services, Antioch High School
  • Melissa Harkreader, Academy of Global Health and Science, Hillsboro High School
  • Steve Shaeffer, Academy of Musical Performance, Overton High School
  • Janet Wallace, Academy of Science and Engineering, Stratford STEM Magnet High School
  • Nick Wilson, Ford Academy of Business and Innovation, Glencliff High School

Executive Principal of the Year (Presented by Altria)

  • Susan Kessler, Hunters Lane High School
  • Adrienne Koger, Antioch High School
  • Shuler Pelham, Overton High School

MNPS Named a District of Distinction

Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools: The Academies of Nashville- Urban High School Transformation

Originally posted at District Administration by Ariana Rawls Fine

In 2006, Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools (MNPS) received a $6.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to implement the Smaller Learning Communities model in its comprehensive high schools.

Public schools in Nashville were in near-crisis mode. MNPS failed to make adequate yearly progress under the federal No Child Left Behind legislation. As a result, in 2009, the district was placed under the direction of the state of Tennessee.

The Academies of Nashville is MNPS’ primary initiative to prepare more than 17,000 high school students for college, career and life. Each of the 12 comprehensive high schools house academies where students take general education classes, electives and specialized courses. Each academy has its own principal, counselor, coach, interdisciplinary team of teachers, and a network of business partners to help students.

The Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce and the nonprofit PENCIL Foundation and Alignment Nashville link community resources to the academies. More than 310 businesses provide opportunities for experiential learning, host teacher teams for training, and help develop curriculum.

The National Career Academy Coalition has accredited 20 of MNPS’ academies with 18 having received the “Model” distinction. In addition to increases in the percentage of students scoring proficient or advanced in the end-of-course exams, MNPS graduation rates have increased from 58 percent in 2005 to 79 percent in 2014.

In recognition of the innovation and success of this initiative, Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools has been named a District of Distinction by District Administration. Metropolitan Nashville was among 62 districts that were honored in the March 2015 round of Districts of Distinction, the magazine’s national recognition program for K12 school districts.

“We are pleased to honor Metropolitan Nashville as a District of Distinction,” says JD Solomon, editorial director at District Administration magazine. “Like all our honorees, Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools serves as a model for school leaders across the country.”

Extracurricular Activities Enhanced by Academy Theme

Every student in the Academies of Nashville has the opportunity to participate in extracurricular activities ranging from band to student government to chess club. Oftentimes, the leadership skills associated with these organizations are enhanced by a student’s pathway or Academy theme. Marisol G., a junior at McGavock High School in the USCCU/ Gaylord Opryland Academy of Hospitality and Finance, talks about her recent trip to the Southern Association of Student Councils Conference. 

 

IMG_0310[1]           From October 11th to October 13th two fellow student council members, our head student council sponsor, and I where in Lawrenceville, Georgia. We attended the Southern Association of Student Councils Conference at Mountain View High School. Student Council members from all over the South came to attend this conference. Throughout the conference, we listened to keynote speakers, met new people from the South, learned more about leadership through hands-on activities, and visited a few local attractions. We went to the World of Coke, Center for Civil and Human Rights, and the Georgia Aquarium. We also helped package meals for the Stop Hunger Now Organization and presented a workshop about School Spirit.

I learned and got so much out of this fun experience. Not only did I get several ideas on how to improve our student council, but I also learned more about what leadership really is. The keynote speakers, Mike Smith in particular, really inspired me to have a more positive impact on people. I learned about connecting, leading, and inspiring. Not only did it relate to student council, but it also related to my pathway class. In my pathway class, we have been learning about the four P’s of marketing. Every where I looked, I saw marketing every where. Promotion was the most common P of marketing that I saw.

RaiderVision Brings Real-World Experience to Students

Experiential learning is a cornerstone to the educational experience in Metro Nashville Public Schools and the Academies of Nashville. Cheyenne S., a student at McGavock High School in the CMT Academy of Digital Design and Communication, writes about her real-world experience of producing a news show. 

The best learning experience I had this year was with my role as the executive producer of RaiderVision. If you don’t know, RaiderVision is McGavock’s tri-weekly news program that airs Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. It informs students of what is going on at school, and has over thirty episodes (as of December 12th). Finished videos are posted onto YouTube; to find and watch any of them, search “raidervision mcgavock” into the search bar and you should find some of our shows.

As executive producer, I help groups with their videos and what they can continue or improve, and am the overseer of the entire class. Anything that has to do with RaiderVision, from organizing the monthly calendar to contacting teachers for new ideas, I am the head of it. My desired career is as a director and producer in both film and television. Being executive producer of McGavock’s news program has not only giving me more experience in what I want to do in life, but also helped as a leadership role. I have always considered myself a leader, but with my roles as an ambassador and executive producer, I am learning how to be a better leader, and I could never be more thankful for those who are helping me with this challenge. The 2015 school year will hold much more success as I continue learning and participating.