Overton High School

“Preparing Students for College, Career, and Life”

By Susan Cowley
University of Tennessee- Knoxville

 

Metro Nashville Public Schools prepares students for “college, career, and life.” It’s a part of the vision statement for Nashville’s school district, but how exactly does this happen? One method involves students receiving industry related professional certifications before high school graduation.

Students in the Academies of Nashville are meeting industry standards to receive professional certifications before walking across stage in their caps and gowns. In fact, during the 2013-2014 pilot year, more than 180 students received certifications in more than a dozen areas.

After completing a yearlong preparatory course, students have the opportunity to take the certification test. If a student passes the exam and meets other certification specific criteria, he or she will walk out of high school with a competitive edge in the workforce. The certifications range across multiple fields from healthcare to broadcasting.

Teachers in the school system have been instrumental to the success of this program. Criminal Justice instructor Jeremiah Davis has seen more students to receive certification than any other teacher in the district.

“Obtaining a certification helps demonstrate maturity at a young age and determination to accomplish goals” says Davis, from Whites Creek High School. It is evident he feels that these certifications leave longstanding positive effects as he states, “When I see my former students and even students from other schools I offered the certifications to, they let me know they are working because of their certification.” Davis knows that it is well worth the effort to see students reap the benefits of industry certification. “My students know that the way to get ahead in life is to stand out in a positive way. Certifications allow a student to graduate with a great distinction and work as they are in college or start their career immediately.”

Stratford STEM Magnet High School graduate, Reggie Mayes sees the benefits of industry certifications in his own life. Mayes says his certification aided him in becoming a more mature individual. He is now working as an unarmed security guard at a local grocery store.

Mayes believes that his certification has “helped me get my life on track to start a good life after school.” He also considers the certification process to have fostered strong, positive relationships between him and his teachers.

Not only does the industry certification program profit the students, it strengthens the teachers as well. “I’ve seen significant improvements to my own work as a result of the training and certification” says Becky Banazsak-Pendergrass, Broadcasting/Media Production Teacher and CTE Cluster Lead Teacher at Hillsboro High School. Banazsak-Pendergrass recently became certified to host a testing cite at Hillsboro; bringing the school the distinction of being one of the only testing facilities for Final Cut Pro in the state of Tennessee. She feels this has given her greater insight into the process as a whole. She strongly supports student certification, and says, “not only does it hold students to a much higher standard, but it also gives them a real-world benefit…obtaining a professional certification that is recognized by their industry of study is a very practical step they can take towards a successful career.” Banazsak-Pendergrass believes the greatest benefit that students receive is an overall boost in motivation; she sums up her experience with certifications by stating, “Students who in the past may have done just barely enough work to pass the course are now taking ownership of their learning experience, actively taking notes and asking questions throughout instructional time, and seeking out additional opportunities for learning and practice.”

This opportunity would not be possible without the support of the Nashville Career Advancement Center, the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce, as well as federal CTE grants. Through the generous donations of these organizations, students were able to earn certifications worth hundreds of dollars for an individual fee of $10.

Industry certifications are an exciting new benefit for graduates of all MNPS high school programs. “Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools will provide every student with the foundation of knowledge, skills and character necessary to excel in higher education, work and life.” Certifications play a key role in instilling confidence, motivation, and success in each individual student. It is evident that the opportunities allowed to students through professional certifications strengthen the goals and values of the MNPS school system.Pe

Metro Students Dig In

Students from Glencliff, McGavock, Overton, and Whites Creek High Schools travelled to the Nashville Research and Education Farm at Tennessee State University on Tuesday, Sept. 16 to get hands-on experience in land judging. Davidson County Soil and Water Conservation, the Natural Resources Conservation Services, and TSU Agriculture and Environmental Science professors worked with students to learn about the physical characteristics of soil, how to interpret the best land uses, recommend management practices, and even examine the suitability for homesites.

This experiential learning opportunity marks the first annual event at Tennessee State University and reflects the continued growth of the agriculture programs within the Academies of Nashville. A team of four students will represent each school next week at the Middle Tennessee Regional FFA Contest at the Highland Rim Experiment Station in Springfield.

 

 

FFA members from Glencliff, McGavock, Overton, and Whites Creek pose as a group before making their way into the soil judging pits.

FFA members from Glencliff, McGavock, Overton, and Whites Creek pose as a group before making their way into the soil judging pits.

Students in soil pit

Students work with TSU Scientist and Research Professor Dr. Jason DeKoff to evaluate the soil at the Research Farm.

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Students wet down the soil in order to determine a variety of properties that can be found in a single handful of soil.

Overton Students Show Off their Green Thumbs

The Academies of Nashville business partners are an essential element to high school redesign. While many partnerships occur in the classroom through guest speakers and mentoring, there are some partnerships that occur with students outside of the school grounds. Rebecca Farrow,  an agricultural education teacher at Overton High School recently shared her experiences after receiving this type of support from the Natural Resources Conservation Services and University of Tennessee Extension Office to help grow her program, student, and school. 

On September 11th Shantel King, a Soil Conservationist from the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), came to Overton High School to speak with the dual-credit Greenhouse Management students. She presented information about the importance of soil, opportunities within NRCS, and how NRCS works within our communities. Students completed a hands-on soil texture analysis to identify sand, silt, and clay particles and then were challenged to correctly identify an unknown soil sample. Students also learned how to pace off a distance for determining slope of a landscape and discussed the purpose of soil and land judging. The presentation provided great background information for the District FFA Land Judging Career Development event at Tennessee State University’s Experiential Learning Farm Lab where we will be competing against students from Williamson and Davidson Counties.

 

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JOHS Soils 3

 

On Monday, September 15th Overton’s urban agriculture students spent time working in the garden. As summer crops come to an end, now is the perfect time to start cool season vegetables and greens. With the help of Dan Harrell, UT Extension Agent specializing in school and community gardens, students prepared garden beds and planted turnip and collard greens for a late fall harvest.

Students in the urban agriculture program are working with community members and local organizations to learn how to meet the challenges of agriculture in a growing world, including growing and harvesting local food. For more information about the Urban Agriculture pathway at Overton High School, visit www.overtonffa.ffanow.org.

 

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JOHS Extension 2

JOHS Extension 3

Local FFA chapters receive Environmental Grant from National FFA Organization

Nationwide grant program supports local chapter to engage in service-learning project. 

The McGavock and Overton FFA chapters have both been awarded a $2,000 grant from the National FFA Organization’s Living to Serve: Environmental Grant program. These chapters have developed a year-long service-learning project to meet a local environmental need. The Living to Serve: Environmental Grants are provided through funding from CSX, as a special project of the National FFA Foundation.

McGavock FFA Chapter

McGavock FFA is one of the longest running FFA chapters in Nashville with a history of success. Students in this program study pre-veterinary science in the Aegis Sciences Corporation Academy of Health Science and Law.  McGavock FFA is collecting used household items to “Reduce, Reuse and Recycle” into pet toys for a local animal shelter. To further reduce waste, FFA members are also conducting a DIY recycled pet toy contest with local 8th graders to educate them on why we should all reduce, reuse, and recycle.

Overton FFA Chapter

Overton High School is one of four agriculture programs in Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools (MNPS) and is focusing on urban agriculture. Many of the students in this area are recent immigrants to the United States. A reality of urban areas is that most families have limited space and for many, limited resources. Urban and community gardens are gaining in popularity, especially with families that are looking to grow more diverse produce for ethnic cooking. Whether the family has access to a small garden of their own or a church or community garden, they could benefit from soil amendments with the heavy clay soils here in middle Tennessee. Composting allows families to reduce their waste while creating a very useful soil amendment. This grant project will teach local community members about the benefits of composting and help them set-up a composting program. The grant will focus on small scale composting including small outdoor bins, tumblers, and vermicomposting (using worms) that can be conducted indoors for families with minimal or no yard space. As part of this grant, the chapter will host a minimum of three educational workshops over the life of the grant. Two will be for elementary or middle school students from their feeder schools teaching them about vermicomposting, including setting up a compost bin for their classrooms. The third workshop will be for the local community and will present different composting set ups including tumblers, small bins, and vermicomposting. Students will present different compost designs and evaluate their use with the workshop attendees. As a result of this grant, students will create a minimum of four different styles of composting bins and a vermicomposting center for the classroom. Inputs will be tracked to determine how much waste is diverted out of the trash stream. Students will use this information to create an Agriscience Fair research project and could potentially start a variety of Supervised Agricultural Experience projects as a result.

These projects illustrate the final line of the FFA motto (“Learning to Do, Doing to Learn, Earning to Live, Living to Serve”) by encouraging FFA members to unite in service within their communities. The Living to Service: Environmental Grants take community serve one step further to service-learning, which provides a meaningful way to apply leadership and education skills learned in school and FFA. More information about this program can be found at www.ffa.org/envirogrants.

Which School is Right for Me?

Selecting the right high school, with the right academy, is an important step for students and families in Nashville. More options are available than ever before and the option school application provides families with the chance to sign up for the program that best fits their needs. Visiting our schools is an important step in the decision-making process.

Showcases provide an opportunity to experience the school environment, learn more about academy offerings, talk with teachers and current students, and meet school leadership. Even if you miss a showcase that interests you, call the school and ask to schedule a visit.  All of the Academies of Nashville offer a unique selection of academies that are tailored to students’ interests and provide college-preparatory education.

 

High School Date Time Phone Number
Antioch High School Tuesday, October 21 5:30 – 7:00 615-641-5400
Cane Ridge High School Friday, October 17 4:00 – 6:00 615-687-4000
Glencliff High School Tuesday, September 30 6:00 – 7:30 615-333-5070
Hillsboro High School Friday, September 12 5:00 – 6:45 615-298-8400
Hillwood High School Thursday, October 30 5:45 – 7:00 615-353-2025
Hunters Lane High School Thursday, October 16 6:00 – 7:30 615-860-1401
Maplewood High School Wednesday, October 15 6:00 – 8:00 615-262-6770
McGavock High School Tuesday, September 23 6:30 – 8:00 615-885-8850
Overton High School Friday, October 17 5:00 – 7:00 615-333-5135
Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School Thursday, October 16 6:00 – 7:30 615-329-8150
Stratford STEM MagnetHigh School Tuesday, October 21 5:30 – 7:30 615-242-6730
The MNPS Virtual School Wednesday, October 22 4:30 – 6:00 615-463-0188 ext. 3900
Whites Creek High School Tuesday, October 28 6:00 – 7:30 615-876-5132

How do you spell leadership?

A-M-B-A-S-S-A-D-O-R

The Academies of Nashville hosted its third annual Ambassador Leadership Conference last month where more than 200 high school ambassadors learned about the student leadership challenge.  Ambassadors learned to model the way, challenge the process, encourage the heart, enable others to act, and inspire a shared vision; skills that will be called upon during their year as an Academy Ambassador. But, what else do you get when you bring 200 future leaders together into one room? A ton of fun, camaraderie, and memories!

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Overton High School Virtual Tour

Take a tour of Overton High School. Learn more about the Academies at Overton and what learning looks like in Metro Nashville Public Schools.

Great Things Happening at Overton High School: A Principals’ Perspective

John Overton High School has long prided themselves as excelling in academics, athletics, and the arts.  Certainly this year has been no exception in that tradition.  They have had students competing at the State and National level in VEX Robotics, Science Olympiad, and HOSA.  This spring they swept District 12 with championships in Baseball, Softball, Soccer, and Tennis.  They even had two All-American Marching Band members!  Yet the most amazing accomplishments may have come without any special medals and ribbons.  These accomplishments center around a solid culture of social and emotional learning.

To set the scene you must know that John Overton High School is the most diverse school in Tennessee.  Students from 63 different countries speaking over 50 different languages walk the hallways of this school.  In some schools this amount of diversity could be seen as a challenge, but at Overton High School it has been embraced as an asset.  There are two real keys to making this happen.  The first is a staff of caring and competent teachers who reach out to build relationships with students every day.  The other is the structure of Career Academies that support a sense of family.

In the Academy model students are able to select a career academy and pathway that aligns with their interests.  As they progress through school they are able to make more connections between the curriculum that is taught in school and the needs of the adult and business world.  Project-based learning is a cornerstone of this model.  Project-based learning, or PBL, allows students to find ways to apply their learning to real-world scenarios–they have more voice in how they demonstrate mastery of standards while receiving feedback from their teacher, peers, and stakeholders in the community.  Students see more purpose in their learning and stay more engaged.  This level of engagement with students has resulted in significant increases in student attendance while simultaneously decreasing student disciplinary referrals.

This spring John Overton High School hosted a tour of educators from around the nation to learn more about their success in this model.  During this tour many administrators and teachers commented to Overton Executive Principal, Dr. Shuler Pelham, “the students just seem so happy here—they really love their school”.

Overton Student Mohamad Obaid

Overton Student Mohamad Obaid

Last month State Senator Steve Dickerson visited John Overton High School and had the opportunity to meet several students.  During his visit, Overton Senior Mohamad Obaid shared with him “Overton has been the best 4 years of my life.  My academy is like my family—I wake up in the morning and I can’t wait to get to school.  I wasn’t always like this—but my teachers just kept believing in me and telling me what I could do, and eventually I came to see it.  I just love it here!”  Mohamad will graduate this spring and plans to attend college at MTSU where he will major in computer science.

Tie for Academy of the Year

On May 12, 2014, the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce hosted the annual Academy Awards. Teachers, principals, business partners, and community interest groups came together to celebrate the achievements of the 2013-2014 school year and recognize those schools that have made outstanding gains. 

Academy of the YearFor the first time ever, two academies tied for the Academy of the Year. Congratulations to McGavock High School’s Aegis Sciences Corporation Academy of Health Science and Law and Overton High School’s Academy of Engineering.

McGavock High School Aegis Science Corporation Academy of Health Science and Law

The Aegis Science Corporation Academy of Health Science and Law is committed to advancing health science and law education to build a better community. Teams focus on ensuring success by analyzing data and using it for continuous improvement, and meetings are purposeful and focused around student achievement. Because they know how their students learn best, teachers have embraced project-based, interdisciplinary teaching and learning. Working cohesively with business partners, they have achieved 100 percent participation in industry tours and job shadowing, as well as numerous capstone projects and internships. Several academy students are enrolled in dual-credit and dual-enrollment courses and are earning industry certifications. Even with nine new teachers last year, the academy committed to working collaboratively and undergoing the accreditation process, earning a perfect score! This academy was invited to present at the 2013 NCAC conference and was able to showcase their work for Ford Hub guests and other school teams. It was officially named and branded by academy partner Aegis Sciences Corporation on March 11.

Overton High School Academy of Engineering

Built on a firm foundation of strong partnerships with LP Building Projects and Stantec Consulting, the Overton Academy of Engineering has grown by leaps and bounds over the past few years, earning the NCAC model academy status in 2013. The academy continues to expand opportunities for students by partnering with Vanderbilt University School of Engineering and Trevecca Nazarene University Urban Farm and offering interdisciplinary lessons combined with trips to LP Field, the Parthenon, Percy Priest Dam, and an LP manufacturing plant. The academy continues to host successful TSA and FFA clubs, as well as sponsoring the state champion VEX Robotics Team. Although their focus is on math and science, the academy strives to improve literacy as well in every class, every day. Most importantly, engineering students know they are part of a team that includes teachers, students, partners, parents, and administrators who care about each other and value rigorous academics and live-based learning experiences.

 

Pittman named Academy Principal of the Year

On May 12, 2014, the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce hosted the annual Academy Awards. Teachers, principals, business partners, and community interest groups came together to celebrate the achievements of the 2013-2014 school year and recognize those schools that have made outstanding gains. 

Academy PrincipalJill Pittman is currently the Academy Principal for the Academy of Information Technology at Overton High School. Pittman considers innovation and servant leadership to be her greatest contribution to the Academy of Information Technology. She is proudest of creating an international space for student voice, in all 53 languages spoken by students in her academy. Working with web design students, Pittman co-created a new IT academy slogan and logo to communicate the evolution of the academy’s brand, and she co-designed the goal medal-winning Project Expo entry with a programming class. She arranges field trips not just for students, but for academy teachers, so they also stay informed about the tech scene in Nashville. Working with business and community partners, she ensures the relevancy of technology projects to her academy and all of Overton. Pittman is a doer, rather than a delegator, and can be found in the middle of the action with her teachers and students as her partners.

2014 Academy Video Awards

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All zoned high schools and the MNPS Virtual School are invited to participate in a district-wide competition to create marketing videos that focus the unique aspects offered through the Academies of Nashville. Videos will be shared with the broader community to tell your school’s Academy story and raise awareness about the Academies of Nashville.

We need your help to determine the winner of the Community Favorite award! Watch the nominees and cast your vote to decide which Academy will win!

Videos can be seen here.

Which Academy Video is your favorite?

  • Stratford STEM Magnet High School- Academy of National Safety and Security Technologies 2014 Academy Commercial (47%, 41,303 Votes)
  • Whites Creek High School- Academy of Education and Law 2014 Academy Commercial (37%, 33,029 Votes)
  • Hillsboro High School Academy of International Business and Communication 2014 Academy Commercial (6%, 5,431 Votes)
  • Hillsboro High School- Academy of International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme 2014 Academy Commercial (2%, 2,049 Votes)
  • Hunters Lane High School- Academy of Design and Technology 2014 Academy Commercial (2%, 1,819 Votes)
  • Whites Creek High School- Academy of Education and Law 2014 Student Story (1%, 1,202 Votes)
  • Hillsboro High School- Academy of Global Health and Science 2014 PBL (1%, 683 Votes)
  • Overton High School- Academy of Information Technology 2014 Academy Commercial (1%, 535 Votes)
  • McGavock High School- Academy of Health Science and Law 2014 PBL (0%, 421 Votes)
  • Stratford STEM Magnet High School- Academy of National Safety and Security Technologies 2014 Experiential Learning (0%, 277 Votes)
  • Hunters Lane High School- Academy of International Baccalaureate 2014 Academy Commercial (0%, 276 Votes)
  • Stratford STEM Magnet High School- Academy of National Safety and Security Technologies 2014 Student Story (0%, 245 Votes)
  • Stratford STEM Magnet High School- Academy of Science and Engineering 2014 Academy Commercial (0%, 214 Votes)
  • Hunters Lane High School- Academy of Health and Human Services 2014 Academy Commercial (0%, 208 Votes)
  • Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School- Academy of Entertainment Communication 2014 Academy Commercial (0%, 154 Votes)
  • Stratford STEM Magnet High School- Academy of Science and Engineering 2014 PBL (0%, 105 Votes)
  • Stratford STEM Magnet High School- Freshman Academy 2014 Academy Commercial (0%, 104 Votes)
  • Hillsboro High School- Academy of International Business and Communication 2014 Student Story (0%, 104 Votes)
  • Hunters Lane High School- Academy of Hospitality 2014 Experiential Learning (0%, 100 Votes)
  • Hillwood High School- Academy of Health Science 2014 Experiential Learning (0%, 79 Votes)
  • Stratford STEM Magnet High School- Academy of Science and Engineering 2014 Student Story (0%, 70 Votes)
  • Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School- Academy of Entertainment Management 2014 Academy Commercial (0%, 69 Votes)
  • Hillwood High School- Academy of Health Science 2014 Academy Commercial (0%, 64 Votes)
  • Stratford STEM Magnet High School- Freshman Academy 2014 Experiential Learning (0%, 58 Votes)
  • Stratford STEM Magnet High School- Academy of Science and Engineering "I Can" Commercial (0%, 44 Votes)
  • Hillwood High School- Academy of Health Science "I Can" Video (0%, 39 Votes)
  • Hunters Lane High School- Academy of Marketing and Business 2014 Academy Commercial (0%, 39 Votes)
  • Hillwood High School- Academy of Art, Design, and Communication "I Can" Video (0%, 20 Votes)
  • Hunters Lane High School- Freshman Academy 2014 Commercial (0%, 18 Votes)
  • Hillwood High School- Academy of Health Science 2014 Student Story (0%, 10 Votes)
  • Hillsboro High School- Freshman Academy 2014 Academy Commercial (0%, 10 Votes)
  • McGavock High School- Academy of Avitation and Transportation 2014 Academy Commercial (0%, 4 Votes)
  • McGavock High School- CMT Academy of Digital Design and Communication 2014 Academy Commercial (0%, 3 Votes)
  • Glencliff High School- Academy of Environmental and Urban Planning 2014 "I Can" Video (0%, 3 Votes)
  • McGavock High School- CMT Academy of Digital Design and Communication 2014 Experiential Learning (0%, 2 Votes)
  • McGavock High School- CMT Academy of Digital Design and Communication 2014 Student Story (0%, 2 Votes)
  • Glencliff High School- Academy of Medical Science and Research 2014 Academy Commercial (0%, 2 Votes)
  • McGavock High School- Gaylord Entertainment Academy of Hospitality/ USCCU Academy of Business and Finance 2014 Academy Commercial (0%, 1 Votes)
  • McGavock High School- Gaylord Entertainment Academy of Hospitality/ USCCU Academy of Business and Finance 2014 PBL (0%, 1 Votes)

Total Voters: 88,770

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2014 Academies of Nashville Awards

The Nashville Chamber of Commerce is proud to present the finalists for the 2014 Academies of Nashville Awards, sponsored by Altria. Each year, the Chamber organizes a group of teachers, administrators, and community partners to select the best that the Academies of Nashville have to offer. MNPS employees and Academy Partners nominated people and programs for awards in fifteen categories. These nominations were based on the National Career Academy Coalition‘s National Standards of PracticeMNPS administrators and executive staff, school board members, teachers, and community partners will have the opportunity to vote in order to determine the winners, which will be announced on May 12, 2014 at a special event held at Rocketown. Congratulations to all of the finalists for your outstanding work during the 2013–2014 school year!

Academy Teacher of the Year (CTE of Thematic Pathway) – presented by Deloitte

  • James Anderson, Academy of Automotive Technology, Antioch High School
  • Rebecca Banaszak, Academy of International Business and Communication, Hillsboro High School
  • Lauren Beck, Academy of Information Technology, Overton High School
  • Cedric Caldwell, Academy of Entertainment Management, Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School
  • Jeremiah Davis, Academy of Education and Law, Whites Creek High School

Academy Teacher of the Year (General Education) – presented by Dollar General

  • Paul Beavers, Freshman Academy, Hillsboro High School
  • Nekesha Burnette, Freshman Academy, Antioch High School
  • Marci Garner, Academy of Sports Medicine and Wellness, Maplewood High School
  • Cheryl Jolley, Academy of Information Technology, Overton High School
  • Laura Vignon, CMT Academy of Digital Design and Communication, McGavock High School

Academy Team Leader of the Year

  • Tobey Green, Academy of National Safety and Security Technologies, Stratford STEM Magnet High School
  • LaSheryl Jones-Hall, Academy of Entertainment Management, Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School
  • Tripp (John) Nicholson, Academy of Business and Hospitality, Hillwood High School
  • Marrkus Marshall, Academy of Community Health, Whites Creek High School
  • Sarah Wolf, Academy of Engineering, Overton High School

Academy Partnership of the Year- Arts, Media, and Communications

  • Country Music Hall of Fame and the Academy of Arts and Communication, Cane Ridge High School
  • The Parthenon and the Academy of Art, Design, and Communication, Hillwood High School
  • Warner Music Nashville and the Academy of Entertainment Communication, Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School

Academy Partnership of the Year- Business, Marketing, and Information Technology

  • Deloitte and the Academy of Information Technology, Overton High School
  • Fifth Third Bank and the Academy of Business and Consumer Services, Maplewood High School
  • US Community Credit Union and the US Community Credit Union Academy of Business and Finance, McGavock High School

Academy Partnership of the Year- Engineering, Manufacturing, and Industrial Technology

  • Earl Swensson (ESA) and the Academy of Environment and Urban Planning, Glencliff High School
  • Trevecca- Nazarene University and the Academy of Engineering, Overton High School
  • Universal Robotics and the Academy of Science and Engineering, Stratford STEM Magnet High School

Academy Partnership of the Year- Health and Public Services

  • Aegis Sciences Corporation and the Academy of Health Science and Law, McGavock High School
  • Frist Center for the Visual Arts and the Academy of Teaching and Service, Antioch High School
  • Southern Hills Medical Center and the Academy of Health Sciences, Overton High School

Academy Partnership of the Year- Hospitality and Tourism

  • Event Logistics and the Academy of Hospitality, Hunters Lane High School
  • Holiday Inn at Vanderbilt and the Academy of Business and Hospitality, Hillwood High School
  • Nashville Opera and the Academy of Hospitality, Antioch High School

Academy Coach of the Year

  • Jennifer Berry, Stratford STEM Magnet High School
  • Emily Hughes, Hillwood High School
  • Sonya Mansfield, Maplewood High School

Externship Project of the Year- presented by the Memorial Foundation

  • Nashville Shakespeare Festival/ Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art/ Vanderbilt Center for Latin American Studies and the Academy of International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme, Hillsboro High School
  • Frist Center for the Visual Arts and the Academy of Teaching and Service, Antioch High School
  • U.S. Army Corp of Engineers and the Academy of Science and Engineering, Stratford STEM Magnet High School

Academy Assistant Principal of the Year- presented by Altria

  • Shatrina Cathey, Academy of Health Science and Law, McGavock High School
  • Melissa Harkreader, Academy of Global Health and Science, Hillsboro High School
  • Darren Kennedy, Academy of Alternative Energy, Sustainability, and Logistics/ Academy of Education and Law, Whites Creek High School
  • Jill Pittman, Academy of Information Technology, Overton High School
  • Janet Wallace, Academy of Science and Engineering, Stratford STEM Magnet High School

Executive Principal of the Year- presented by Altria

  • Adrienne Koger, Antioch High School
  • Clint Wilson, Glencliff High School
  • Ron Woodard, Maplewood High School

Academy Counselor of the Year

  • Meri Kock, Academy of International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme, Hillsboro High School
  • Susan Murphy, Academy of Business and Consumer Services, Maplewood High School
  • Ashley Shaver, Academy of Art, Design, and Communication, Hillwood High School

Freshman Academy of the Year

  • Antioch High School Freshman Academy
  • Maplewood High School Freshman Academy
  • Whites Creek High School Freshman Academy

Academy of the Year

  • Academy of Architecture and Construction, Cane Ridge High School
  • Academy of Marketing and Business, Hunters Lane High School
  • Academy of Health Science and Law, McGavock High School
  • Academy of Engineering, Overton High School

TEDxNashvilleEd: Ideas Worth Spreading

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TEDxNashvilleEd

MNPS Academies of Nashville Student Success

Thursday, March 20, 2014

9:00 am – 2:00 pm

Tennessee Performing Arts Center, Polk Theater

Admission is FREE

MNPS has partnered with TEDxNashville to showcase students in our high schools who have implemented innovative thoughts, ideas, and programs to make their schools and communities better.  And it’s being called TEDxNashvilleEd.

Throughout the semester, students have attended public speaking and student leadership workshops led by the Director of the Academies of Nashville, Dr. Chaney Mosley. Students then had the opportunity to audition for one of the twelve speaker slots. The auditions were very competitive! Each students has been paired with an adult mentor to help refine their performance.

We hope that you will come out and support those innovative and talented students. Come for the whole day or drop in for your student’s performance. We look forward to sharing MNPS Academies of Nashville student talent with all of you!

Schedule of Events

9:00 Chaney Mosley“Play Nice & Remember to Share”
9:15 Gellcye Alegre“Il Colore Marrone”McGavock High School
9:30 Kordell Young“Hope”Glencliff High School
9:45 DeShaun Clarke &
Johnathan Crutchfield“One of Us”Cane Ridge High School
10:00 Break
10:15 Pel Doski“Finding A Home”Overton High School
10:30 Hamza Chaudhery“The Tutor Antioch Program”Antioch High School
10:45 JC McCaw“An Outside Perspective on Public Education”Hillsboro High School
11:00 Break for Lunch
12:00 Simone Williams“Embracing Diversity”White Creek High School
12:15 Milton Patino“The Power of ‘Yes’”Antioch High School
12:30 Tamara Milford“My Future. My Way.”McGavock High School
12:45 Break
1:00 Stacy Crescencio“The Story of Our Lives Only Makes Us Stronger”Cane Ridge High School
1:15 Farzin Dehghan “From Isfahan to Nashville- The Bridge that Music Built”Overton High School
1:30 Tytiauna Ruffin“Single Parent Homes”McGavock High School

NPT American Graduate Community Town Hall

In January 2014, Nashville Public Television brought community members to their studios to speak on education in middle Tennessee as a part of CPB’s American Graduate program. In this town hall meeting, parents, students, teachers, administrators, and business partners speak about the Academies of Nashville, school choice, standardized testing, and other topics.

It’s finally here…

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What’s finally here? The Academies of Nashville Parent Ambassador Program!

Last night, parents from throughout the Academies of Nashville came together for the first ever Parent Ambassador Orientation where they learned more about the academies, ambassador responsibilities, and how to advocate for their schools. In a study conducted by Enterprise City Schools, more than 85% of the general public believes that support from parents is the most important way to improve the schools.

The parent ambassador program encourages schools and academies to partner with parents to communication the direction, evaluation, and purpose of the Academies of Nashville as well as provide a forum for parents to have a voice in education. Parent Ambassadors will become school advocates to promote community support, increase parent participation, and communicate the message of the Academies of Nashville. Stay tuned to this blog to view their inaugural postings and introductions in the coming weeks.

Thanks to all of our 2013-2014 Parent Ambassadors!

Antioch High School

  • Tara Williams
  • Tina Walker

Cane Ridge High School

  • Linda Dean

Glencliff High School

  • Andrea Sanchez

Hillsboro High School

  • Sherry Koty

Hillwood High School

  • Sandy Murabito

Hunters Lane High School

  • Sherry Donaghey

Maplewood High School

  • Gloria Whitley

McGavock High School

  • Bernette Shaw-Wakeman

Overton High School

  • Kimberly Jackson
  • Kim Jones
  • Karen Hensley

Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School

  • Kia Williams

Stratford STEM Magnet High School

  • Tracy Utley

Whites Creek High School

  • Angela Blakely

To get involved in the Academies or Nashville or find out more information about the Parent Ambassador Program, please contact your school’s Academy Coach.